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Micropulsing / Blood Electrification

How often should I apply micropulsing? Can I use the unit for more than two hours a day?
What is electroporation/transfection and should I be concerned?
Do I have to be on a special diet when micropulsing? What about food supplements or herbs - are those okay?
Why did Bob say we shouldn't eat garlic when micropulsing? Can't I eat garlic anymore?
Can I apply the micropulsing unit if I am taking a prescription drug?
What is the significance of the 4 Hertz in the blood electrifier?
What is the difference between the Beck micropulsing unit and the Clark Zapper or the Rife Machine?
The skin on my wrist is irritated after micropulsing. Is that normal?
Can we micropulse on each wrist at the same time and/or one wrist and one ankle and/or two ankles?
How often should I apply micropulsing? Can I use the unit for more than two hours a day?

Bob originally suggested 2 hours per day as a guideline. However, many individuals regularly micropulse for several hours a day; some even up to 24-hours straight. Of course you'll need to check that the cotton covers remain adequately moistened throughout any period of micropulsing so the current is flowing properly. And watch for detoxification reactions (also known as Herxheimer Reaction), which can be triggered by the release of pathogens. As long as these waste products are being eliminated efficiently from the body, longer periods of micropulsing should not pose a problem. Drinking water helps flush the toxic wastes from your body. Drinking a glass of ozonated water before and after pulsing may be even more beneficial.

In case you're wondering, it takes only a few minutes for blood to circulate 'round trip' throughout the body. Pulsing for a minimum of 2 hours per day should provide a thorough treatment.

For usage guidelines, please read the Guide to Using the Beck Protocol. You'll find suggestions for initial and ongoing use, tips for serious illness, and more.

What is electroporation/transfection and should I be concerned?

The idea of electroporation (sometimes called "transfection", which isn't quite the same thing) has taken on a life of its own.

By definition, electroporation is a transfection method that uses an electrical pulse to create temporary pores in cell membranes, through which substances can pass into the cells. Electroporation is the method, and transfection is the result - transferring material into cells. In fact, transfection is happening all the time; cells open and close pores regularly to take in nutrients and expel waste. Electroporation, however, is more of a 'forced' transfection. It's beyond what occurs naturally.

Here's the real story behind how electroporation became an issue with micropulsing:

Back in the early 1990s, a paper authored by research scientist James C. Weaver was presented to Bob. This paper discussed the idea that electricity could possibly multiply substances in the bloodstream when the electricity is applied to the cells.

There was initial concern that microcurrents might be able to trigger electroporation. For people taking prescriptions or other potentially toxic substances, the concern was that the effect of these substances might get multiplied by the electroporation effect - as cells would open up to absorb more of the substance.

What's often overlooked is that the Weaver study clearly states electroporation takes place at 200 V/cm2 (Volts per centimeter squared). The Beck blood electrifier output is only 7 V/cm2 - not even close to what Weaver states is required. Because of this, electroporation is not an issue with the Beck Protocol.

This technology has been available to the public for over 20 years with no incidents of electroporation due to use of a Beck unit. It's our understanding that when the issue first came up, Bob felt it was best to be cautious and suggested taking the prescription drugs after micropulsing to minimize exposure, and that advice is always something you can take advantage of if you're feeling that's the best course of action for you.

Back to the question - even though thousands of micropulsers have never experienced electroporation over more than two decades of use, nevertheless, electroporation has become something of an urban legend. It is misinformation. Electroporation and/or transfection is NOT an issue when using any of the Beck units.

Do I have to be on a special diet when micropulsing? What about food supplements or herbs - are those okay?

No special diet required! This doesn't mean, of course, that good, common sense nutrition should be ignored. Far from it. Provide your body with quality 'fuel' and you will be rewarded with a body that heals faster.

Supplements and herbs are an individual choice, perhaps in consultation with a natural health practitioner. There are no prohibitions when micropulsing and consuming food supplements or herbs.

Part of taking back our power is taking responsibility for learning about our bodies and familiarizing ourselves with what's "normal" and what's not, so it's possible to recognize when adjustments need to be made. The Beck Units are amazing tools, but to optimize results, we each have to develop a customized plan according to what works best for us. If you're adding supplements or herbs, start slowly and watch to see how you're doing. Even in the unlikely event of an unforeseen individual reaction, you will be on top of it and be able to make adjustments to your plan.

Why did Bob say we shouldn't eat garlic when micropulsing? Can't I eat garlic anymore?

During his research back in the 1980s on the electrical activity of the brain, Bob noticed that his subject's EEG readings were different after lunch and folks were not as alert.

Naturally curious, Bob investigated, and found the common denominator was the salad dressing, which happened to contain garlic. Based on his observations and previous research on the properties of garlic, Bob believed that garlic was not healthy for the brain.

There may be the isolated case where someone with particular sensitivities reacts by experiencing 'brain fog', but this 'fog' has nothing to do with micropulsing.

Happily, most people can continue to enjoy garlic whether they're micropulsing or not. It's not a factor.

Can I apply the micropulsing unit if I am taking a prescription drug?

Yes...well, probably. For most people, prescription medication can be taken when using the Beck units - no problem. Two individuals let us know they applied micropulsing during chemotherapy they both felt there were no toxic effects and they experienced only beneficial results.

Just keep in mind there are literally thousands of prescription drugs available, with new ones becoming available all the time.

When adding something new like a prescription drug to your routine, start out slowly by micropulsing for shorter periods of time at first, and pay particular attention to how things go. It is remotely possible there may be unforeseen issues - even altering or nullifying the effect of the prescription - so it's prudent to be especially tuned in and aware of how you are responding.

Another tip – Bob always suggested taking medications immediately after the micropulsing session, so the body will have time to process and absorb the medication before the next micropulsing session. The thought was that by doing this it would ensure the lowest level of medication in the blood when micropulsing – which would minimize any reaction, should there be one.

If you decide to use the Beck unit while taking a prescription drug, you are your own best advocate. Again, the beauty of the Beck units is in the ability to customize a usage plan that fits you. You do not have to comply with a single plan used by the masses.

What is the significance of the 4 Hertz in the blood electrifier?

When Bob was developing the blood electrifier, he recognized two concepts were critical to the electrifier functioning as he envisioned. First, he knew he'd need to use a frequency, as it would prevent ion migration (electrophoresis). Second, that frequency would have to be low enough to effectively deliver the microcurrents into the bloodstream.

But which frequency?

Bob knew the natural frequency of the Earth has a healthy effect. That frequency, also known as the Schumann frequency, is 7.83 Hz. To meet the second criteria of being low enough to deliver the microcurrents, Bob chose an harmonic (1/2) of the Earth frequency, 3.92 Hz.

Problem solved.

What is the difference between the Beck micropulsing unit and the Clark Zapper or the Rife Machine?

Each unit has its own purpose and way of working.

Both the Clark Zapper and the Rife Machine are frequency-based units. The Clark Zapper outputs a specific frequency of 30,000 cycles per second (Hz), and the Rife Machine, allows the user to choose a specific frequency. The concept behind the Clark Zapper and Rife Machine is that specific pathogens can be killed with exposure to select frequencies.

In contrast, the Beck blood electrifier (sometimes called the Beck Zapper) delivers microcurrents to the body which help it to heal itself. The microcurrents require a frequency for delivery to the body, which is done using a 3.92 Hz frequency.

So here's what to remember:

The healing modality in the Beck blood electrifier is through the delivery of microcurrents.

The healing modality in the Clark Zapper or Rife Machine is through the delivery of a specific frequencies.

The skin on my wrist is irritated after micropulsing. Is that normal?

This is a common reaction for those new to micropulsing. Gradually, as your skin becomes used to the process, the irritation for many decreases and diminishes over time. With permission, we've borrowed a list of suggestions from SOTA Instruments. It's a comprehensive list and should assist those who experience sensitivity. Refer to their list for the most up-to-date description:

When using the Micropulsing electrodes the skin may become irritated. Over time, the irritation usually decreases. With longer periods of continuous use, skin irritation is more likely.

Alternate wrists each day. One day use the right wrist and the next day use the left wrist in order to allow the skin to heal. Here are a few additional suggestions:

  • Wash wrists before applying the electrodes. Our skin has natural oils that can interact with the electricity which may result in a "stinging" sensation.
  • Wet the sleeves using purified water or with Ionic~Colloidal Silver. Ionic~Colloidal Silver has a healing effect.
  • If unable to feel the current using only water, try a commercial saline solution for the eyes. This will be gentler on the skin than adding salt to the water.
  • A conductive gel can be added to the wet sleeves to reduce irritation.
  • Another option is to wrap a small square of paper towel around the electrodes instead of using the cotton sleeves. A customer passed this idea along from her health practitioner. Keep the paper wet. We find it works well and a small square of paper may last for several applications.
  • Wash wrists well after each session and apply a healing gel or lotion such as aloe vera, vitamin E oil or MSM cream.
  • Drink enough water to keep the body well hydrated. Your degree of hydration may affect your sensitivity.
  • Apply the Micropulsing electrodes for shorter periods of time until the irritation disappears.
  • Turn down the intensity.
Can we micropulse on each wrist at the same time and/or one wrist and one ankle and/or two ankles?

Micropulsing on One Wrist
Early on Bob Beck changed to using one wrist for micropulsing – and our experience in the years since continues to support his reasoning.

Micropulsing on one wrist focuses and concentrates the microcurrents into the blood at the ulnar and radial arteries on the wrist. These two positions are where the blood runs closest to the surface of the skin, ensuring microcurrents are effectively delivered to the blood. It is also easier to set up and use while going about your daily activities. This increases the likelihood of regular and consistent use, as well as for longer sessions.

Micropulsing Wrist-to-Wrist (two wrists), Ankle-to-Ankle (two ankles) or One-Wrist-to-One-Ankle
Bob changed to one wrist because he was concerned that a Wrist-to-Wrist configuration by people with weak hearts and/or pacemakers may not be safe. The heart is an electrical organ, and it is not known how microcurrents will interact when traveling across the body between the wrists.

That said, when micropulsing Wrist-to-Wrist, Ankle-to-Ankle or One-Wrist-to-One-Ankle, the microcurrents will not necessarily be confined to the arteries. It's likely the current will spread out and take multiple paths through the body, potentially touching more tissue, the vein system, the lymph system, and even organs. While the potential is for a wider application, the current will not be as concentrated. It will be diffused over a wider area rather than focused on the blood.

Micropulsing on One Ankle
Although not as convenient as the wrist, it is possible to set up both electrodes on the posterior tibial pulse (the pulse point located behind the ankle bone). If you'd like to give this a try, you may want to do an internet search for 'pulse points on the ankle' to locate an image to use as guidance for the placement of the electrodes.

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